Fitness

Fitness is an important part of anyone’s life, but in Low Carb dieting exercise is not the end-all, be-all of weight loss.

In fact, exercise is such an easy part of this lifestyle we can fit it all on one page.

Think of exercise this way: you only need to be strong enough to move your body when in danger. So we are going to do body resistance exercises. So, if you fall in a hole you can pull yourself out. If you fall to the ground you can push yourself up. If you need to run from a mugger you’ll have the speed and stamina to do so.
So let’s get to it!

The Four Essential Movements

Presented by Mark Sisson of Mark’s Daily Apple.

Push Ups

Probably the single greatest muscle-building exercise of all, pushups deserve more respect than they get from the strength community. Yeah, the bench press is sexy, but it can lead to rotator cuff injuries, and it neglects the core-stabilizing aspects of the pushup. The pushup also allows for full scapular range of motion, whereas the bench press requires you to retract the scapulae for the duration in order to preserve your shoulders. If pushups get too easy, you can always increase the load or switch your hand position. This video shows four progressions from Beginner to Expert.

Pull Ups

Climbing a tree to escape a predator, pursue prey, or reach the heights of a particularly bountiful fruit tree; scaling a cliff to nab a nest full of fatty, nutrient-dense bird’s eggs; driving a herd of bison into a ravine to their death and hauling the choicest remains up twenty feet by way of sturdy vines laced together, ropelike, using only Paleolithic elbow grease—these situations called for well-developed “pulling muscles.” Grok wasn’t doing strict military pullups, but he was using the corresponding muscles on a near-daily basis. Your average couch potato can barely do a single pullup, if that. That has to change, and training the pullup can be achieved almost anywhere—using a bit of ingenuity. This video shows four progressions from Beginner to Expert.
Mark Sisson is a renowned Low Carb expert. You can get his FREE Workout book and see his other programs by clicking on the banner below.

Planks

The buzz word “core” refers to perhaps the most misused and misunderstood muscle group of all time. The “core” refers to the muscles that run the length of the trunk and torso. Most gym-goers “work the core” with a series of predictable movements. Sit-ups, crunches, ab machines, ab pulldowns… notice a pattern? They’re all abdominal workouts, but the core is much, much more than just the abs. What about the lower back? The hip flexors? The obliques? Heck, even breaking the core up into individual parts at all completely misses the point. Everyone wants the six-pack, the beach muscles, and they completely miss the fundamental purpose of the core: to provide a stable base for the rest of the body. That’s right, the core is a stabilizer; it can contract (sit-ups, knees-to-elbows, leg lifts), but its primary role is to maintain rigidity and uniformity. The best way to “work the core,” then, without tons of equipment, is through plank progressions. This video shows four progressions from Beginner to Expert.

Squats

Watch kids at play. They squat effortlessly. It’s second nature. And for many modern huntergatherers, the squat represents the default resting position. Some call it the “third world squat.” Most adults in developed countries, meanwhile, bend (incorrectly I might add, compromising the spinal discs) to pick stuff up. Instead of squatting down to rest, we look for a chair. Is it any wonder why many of us have no mobility when it comes to squatting? If it’s not the hips, it’s the knees. If it’s not the ankles, it’s the back. It doesn’t help when most doctors advise against the squat, especially full, lower than parallel squats, because they’re “bad for the knees.” A full squat, performed with proper technique, is perfectly safe and supports knee health. We have generally forgotten how to squat properly, but Primal Blueprint Fitness will develop this lost, essential skill.

You don’t need to perform heavy back squats — I just want you to gain the mobility and strength necessary to perform a full bodyweight squat. Adding massive amounts of weight to a barbell squat will develop strength, power, and good amounts of muscle fiber, but it isn’t necessary for PBF. You will, however, have a firm grasp of proper squat form should you decide to up the ante in the future. This video shows four progressions from Beginner to Expert.

Mark Sisson is a renowned Low Carb expert. You can get his FREE Workout book and see his other programs by clicking on the banner below.

Sprints

Research confirms that an occasional series of short, all-out bursts of effort can have a more profound effect on fitness—especially on fat loss—than a medium-paced jog lasting many times longer. One set of sprints (also know as “interval training”) per week is all you need to improve speed, muscle mass, bone density, cardiovascular strength and aerobic capacity. Sprints help stimulate a pulse of human growth hormone and testosterone (beneficial for both men and women) and it can have an immune-boosting effect. No other exercise modality gives as much bang for the buck. 15 to 20 minutes from warmup to finish and you’re done. And before those of you who are out of shape, grossly overweight, older or have bad knees decide that this part of the PBF plan is not for you, you can definitely pursue low-impact sprinting options (bike, pool, elliptical and other machines) and enjoy similar physiological benefits.
Mark Sisson is a renowned Low Carb expert. You can get his FREE Workout book and see his other programs by clicking on the banner below.